Monday, 30 November 2015

Taking a calculated risk

Still plugging away at the 9 patches, but this morning it got too much for me, as you will see.  I did finish my next big 9x9 - here it is lying in its place.


The interesting bit of this is definitely going to be in how all these bigger bits fit together.  Cutting freehand means that the sizes of these blocks varies quite significantly.  Take a look at the difference between the middle row and the two on the bottom.  See what I mean!  Unless I really can't come with anything better I don't want to trim the bigger ones down so the challenge will be in what to add to the small units.  I reckon this is a pretty good example of the excitement/frustration of this way of going about things.

Anyway I was having a tea break and contemplating my little pile of scraps when I found a tempting piece and an idea struck me.  Forget about the 9 patches - I decided to do this.


And then this.


One of the good things about the 9 patch construction is that if I hated it, I would only have lost 3 little squares, so could reconstitute things quite easily, but as it happens I like it.  I like that it's a slightly different way of adding this fabric, and its an efficient use of the limited quantity I have and I like that it's the reverse of the one on the left; I like that it's another way of adding a bit of width/height.  I also like that chopping into something feels less scary every time I do it!

Linking up with Patchwork Times again today.


13 comments:

  1. Great solution. I'm afraid my obsessive side wouldn't let me free-cut. However, doing some improv sewing will be on my resolution list for 2016.

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  2. I don't think I could do any free cutting. My mind just doesn't think that way. I certainly wouldn't be able to come up with a solution that would bring all the different size blocks together. Like your curve piecing.

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  3. It does feel scary to make big cuts and changes like this, but it turned out great! I like the symmetry and reflection that it gives.

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  4. I often feel that improv sewing is a lot like sculpting in clay -- add a little here, take away a little there. This quilt really proves it! It will be so interesting to see where you end up. :D

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  5. Very interesting! I have not free pieced or free cut but it looks challenging.

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  6. The design process is so captivating isn't it? Thanks for sharing your adventure.

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  7. Inspired idea - I admire your bravery in just going for it. I'm afraid I like to be in control too much!

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  8. This is a great solution. It looks like a circle, and it mirrors the smaller circles.

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  9. Wonderful! Love those lightbulb moments!

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  10. I like it, too. The most important part, though, is what you think. Free piecing is a little like intentionally coloring outside the lines.It's not nearly as radical as we believe, and when you try it for the first time it seems wrong because it goes against 'the rules'. The surprise is when you keep going with it, and see how you can make it work in its own style.I wish there were more free spirits out there willing to experiment, and commend you for showing your process.

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  11. I think one of my favourite things is chopping into something, although until recently it's been all about chopping up art work rather than quilts :) I love the way the curved pieces make a distinct unit too, the disruption in creates to the quiet rhythm :)

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  12. Very effective solution to your sizing woes. I'm too ordered to feel comfortable assembling a quilt that way, but I really like how yours is coming together.

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  13. Your curved pieces completely changed things, in a very artistic way Kaja. I think you are one gutsy quilter!

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